Advancements in Precision Fluid Dispensing System Technology

Automation and Robotics Allow for Higher Precision in Industrial Fluid Dispensing Applications

Precision fluid dispensing systems are utilized in a range of advanced manufacturing applications. At Platypus Technologies, we employ advanced fluid dispensing technology in our biosensor and bioassay fabrication processes, as well as in our conformal coating solutions.

An Overview of the Photolithography Process

Photolithography is a fabrication process used in the production of patterned thin films for precision applications such as microelectronics, biosensors, and custom patterned electrodes. The process utilizes ultraviolet (UV) light to expose a minutely detailed pattern within a light-sensitive photoresist coating.

The coating is deposited on a substrate material and a mask is placed atop the photoresist. UV light therefore interacts only with the areas of the photoresist that are left exposed underneath the mask. Once the mask is removed, a precise geometric pattern remains on the substrate surface, formed via exposure to the UV light.

What Is the Thin Metal Film Deposition Process?

How Thin Film Deposition Works – Its Advantages and Applications

Thin metal film deposition is a unique fabrication process commonly used in the manufacturing of semiconductors, biosensors, and other specialized photolithography applications.

The process involves carefully depositing thin metallic film coating onto a substrate in order to yield specific material properties. For example, specially engineered thin film coatings are used in the fields of optics and imaging to modify the optical properties of glass. In more advanced biomedical and semiconductor applications, thin film deposition is used to create specific molecular properties in the conducting material, further paving the way for highly customizable chip manufacturing.

Gold Puzzle

Building a Better Biosensor Polymer with Organic Semiconducting Materials

Cutting-Edge Engineering Developments in the Biosensor Polymer Manufacturing Industry

Recently, a novel organic semiconducting material was engineered which has the potential to push next-generation biosensor development to new heights. This innovative new carbon-based semiconductor polymer was specifically developed to surpass current biosensor options in sensing performance, reliability, as well as overall biocompatibility.

Raman Scattering of the Sulfur Bond at Metal Surfaces

A research study from Iowa State University explored the potential of using directional Raman scattering spectroscopy to characterize self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) deposited on gold (Au) and silver (Ag) surfaces. SAMs are formed by absorption of organic thiols (R-SH) on metal surfaces and are used in microelectronic applications requiring precise surface patterning of metal films.  

Scanning Tunneling Microscopy of Ultra-flat Gold Surfaces

New STM imaging study reveals stunning atomic-scale details on Ultra-flat Gold Surfaces.

Ultra-flat gold surfaces enable high signal-to-noise imaging for AFM and STM applications.  Because of their ultra-smooth topography, these surfaces have been used to study 2D materials, single strands of DNA, self-assembled monolayers, nano-plasmonic devices, and cell membrane monolayers.    

Cell Invasion Assays for Cancer Research

Cell invasion across the basement membrane is an important step in cancer metastasis.  Metastasis occurs when cancer cells pass through the basement membrane of the organ where they originated, and subsequently spread into different organs of the body, where they form secondary tumors [1].  

Comparison of the Oris Cell Migration Assay to the Scratch Assay

Cell migration is integral to many physiological processes, including embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and wound healing.  In addition, cell migration is involved in tumor metastasis and atherosclerosis.[1]  One assay commonly used to study cell migration in vitro is the scratch assay.  The scratch assay is performed by creating a cell-free gap, or “scratch”, on a confluent cell monolayer upon which cells at the edge of the opening move inward to close the scratch.  Cell migration can be assessed by comparing images captured at the onset of the scratch creation and at user-defined intervals during scratch closure.  The scratch assay is straightforward to perform and is inexpensive.  However, methods for creating the scratch vary from lab to lab and results can be highly variable.  Furthermore, the process of scratch formation has been shown to damage the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM).[2] 

Counting Cells in Migration Assays with ImageJ

This application note describes a method to measure cell migration, using ImageJ, by counting the number of cells that have migrated into the Detection Zone in an Oris™ Cell Migration Assay. ImageJ is a freeware image analysis program developed at the National Institutes of Health (https://imagej.nih.gov/ij/).

Cells on the Move: Do surface coatings influence cell migration?

Experiments show that surface coatings play an important role in cell movement

When performing cell migration experiments, a perennial question is: what surface coatings should be used to culture a particular cell type? Scientists working in Cancer Research, Wound Healing, or Drug Discovery utilize cell cultures to make important experiments and advance our understanding of biological mechanisms.  In particular, assays for cell migration enable characterization of conditions and substances that influence movement of cells.  For example, scientists using the OrisTM Cell Migration Assays successfully identified proteins, mRNA and antioxidants that inhibit migration of tumor cells.